Poetry Friday: A couple of chick poems

A couple of weeks ago, Christie Wyman–today’s  Poetry Friday host–invited any and all to join in her fascination with birds and share a bird-related poem of some sort. I’ve been wanting to write about my chickens for awhile so that fits right in. Then last week Diana Mayr issued a  challenge to write a poem inspired by an image of an animal from the LIbrary of Congress collection. I’ve also been wanting to explore the images in their collection. So I took up both challenges (and DIane’s suggestion to combine them.

First, I headed over to the Library of Congress Digital Collections to search for images of chickens. Let’s just say there were more than a few to choose from, but how could I resist these adorable chicks? The print has a US Copyright of 1777 and is associated with L. Prang and Co. (unverified according to the description). You can find the image here.

Since I’m meeting two challenges, I wrote two poems. First, a haiku:

chicks gather round
a beetle crawling past
tug of war ensues

Next, a cherita:

chicks wander out

scratch and peck
in a grassy field

an unsuspecting beetle
trapped between beaks
becomes a tasty treat

Thank you, Christie and Diane, for inspiring me to take on this challenge!

Each Friday, I am excited to take part in Poetry Friday, where writers share their love of all things poetry. Christie Wyman hosts the Poetry Friday Roundup today at Wondering and Wandering. She gathers a flock of poetry with a challenge to write about bird this week. Don’t worry if you’re off-topic–all poems and subjects are welcome!

18 Comments on Poetry Friday: A couple of chick poems

  1. Carol Varsalona
    August 19, 2018 at 11:28 pm (3 years ago)

    Kay, first I love the image you shared. Second, you provided two treats (and I see the chicks enjoyed your treats, too). The cherita is a form that I have been admiring. Thanks for sharing another one for me to play around with. Diane has so many and now perhaps you will write a cherita about “summering” for my summer gallery.

    Reply
    • Mrs. McGriff
      August 20, 2018 at 8:23 am (3 years ago)

      Thanks, Carol. Enjoying playing with the cherita. It’s deceptively simple!

      Reply
  2. Sally Murphy
    August 18, 2018 at 11:21 pm (3 years ago)

    Love both of these, Kay. It’s always interesting to see the same stimulus produce multiple responses – it encourages new ways of looking.

    Reply
    • Mrs. McGriff
      August 20, 2018 at 8:23 am (3 years ago)

      Thanks, Sally. I have enjoyed reading all the different responses to the same prompt. It’s an explosion of creativity!

      Reply
  3. Molly Hogan
    August 18, 2018 at 8:37 am (3 years ago)

    Between Dian’s post last week and your post this week, I’m inspired to try a cherita. Thanks for the mentor poem! Got to love those cute bloodthirsty little chicks. lol

    Reply
    • Kay Jernigan McGriff
      August 18, 2018 at 7:33 pm (3 years ago)

      Thanks, Molly–chicks are bloodthirsty–but I enjoy mine anyway. I’m looking forward to reading a cherita or two from you! It’s a form I’d like to explore more..

      Reply
  4. Tabatha
    August 17, 2018 at 10:52 am (3 years ago)

    The Library of Congress is such a treasure trove, isn’t it? Cute chicks you found! (Somehow I feel sure there are more beetles to be had, if they were to look around…)

    Reply
    • Kay Jernigan McGriff
      August 18, 2018 at 7:30 pm (3 years ago)

      I enjoyed looking through the images and will definitely go back for more. I’m still looking for a project that would allow me to do real research at the LOC!

      Reply
  5. Linda Baie
    August 17, 2018 at 9:37 am (3 years ago)

    These images that everyone is sharing are wonderful. I love that you found some you like with adorable chicks, Kay. I love the words, “trapped between beaks”. One could apply that to some life experiences, right?

    Reply
    • Kay Jernigan McGriff
      August 18, 2018 at 7:29 pm (3 years ago)

      Thanks, Linda. I haven’t had time yet to visit the others (my daughter’s home on break), but I’m looking forward to seeing them. And yes, “trapped between beaks” does describe some days!

      Reply
  6. Donna
    August 17, 2018 at 9:25 am (3 years ago)

    Ok, what is a cherita? I confess that is new to me! I like both poems very much. They are concise yet vivid.

    Reply
  7. Brenda
    August 17, 2018 at 8:36 am (3 years ago)

    That tiny art conveys the pastoral dreaminess that helps distract from the ruthlessness of nature. You poem is a wonderful counterpoint to it.

    Reply
    • Kay Jernigan McGriff
      August 18, 2018 at 7:25 pm (3 years ago)

      Thanks, Brenda. I often observe that contradiction with my chickens.

      Reply
  8. Kathryn Apel
    August 17, 2018 at 5:29 am (3 years ago)

    I’ve been playing with cheritas in my Antarctic verse novel. They’re a fun challenge, when there’s a certain amount of information you want to convey – and yet be creative with your words! The chickens are cute – but both poems have me feeling for that poor beetle!

    Reply
    • Mrs. McGriff
      August 17, 2018 at 7:53 am (3 years ago)

      I hope to read your cheritas–and novel–soon! The cheritas are a challenge, but fun. Yes, I warn the resident wildlife to stay away from the chicken run. It is not pretty when the frogs don’t listen.

      Reply
  9. Diane Mayr
    August 16, 2018 at 10:25 pm (3 years ago)

    Nicely done, Kay! I’m happy to see the cherita form being taken up by others! I’m looking forward to next week’s virtual gallery opening!

    Reply
    • Mrs. McGriff
      August 17, 2018 at 7:52 am (3 years ago)

      Thanks, Diane. I’m looking forward to seeing the virtual gallery! I would like to explore the cherita form more. It’s quite challenging to do well.

      Reply

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