Posts Tagged ‘Poetry’

Poetry Friday: In Defiance of Snow

Each Friday, I am excited to take part in Poetry Friday, where writers share their love of all things poetry. Tricia Stohr-Hunt has the Poetry Friday Roundup today at The Miss Rumphius Effect. Drop by and see what poetry morsels are offered this week.

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After a mild start, winter has arrived in the Midwest. We’ve had some warm days sprinkled through January and February, but we’ve also been dusted with snow several times. Now snow is back in the forecast early next week. Don’t get me wrong, I still get excited when the snowflakes begin to swirl, and would feel cheated out of winter if we had now snow at all, but I get just as excited about the first signs of spring.

Yesterday, I was surprised to see the green blades of daffodils already poking through the earth underneath the tree in the backyard. Even though the tree branches are still bare and more winter weather is on the way, spring is coming. I wrote this haiku to remember:

Green blades slice skyward

through cold, dark earth, defying

clouds that threaten snow.

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Poetry Friday:

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The big blizzard mostly missed us last weekend, but we did get to enjoy a bit of snow from its fringe as we went with my daughter on a college visit in Evansville. While the university cancelled classes for the day, the Scholars Day visit continued on through the snow. As always, I loved watching the snow transform the drab winter world into a wonderland. Here is the poem that has been percolating every since our first snowfall this year.

Grey clouds squat low in the sky

like old women sifting snowflakes

that mute the colors and blur the edges of the world.

Grey clouds whisper secrets

that blow through the sky,

swirling snowflakes that hide the drab debris of winter

under a white blanket.

Grey clouds laugh in the sky

like old women tucking the world in close

and wrapping it in quiet wonder.

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Catherine has the Poetry Friday Roundup today at Reading to the Core. Drop by and see what poetry morsels are offered this week.

Poetry Friday: Fun with Magnets

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Do you remember when Magnetic Poetry first hit stores way back when? I loved the idea from the first time I heard of it and have had several collections over the years. A few weeks ago I dug out some old kits to play around with. At the time my fridge was covered with papers and calendars and photos, so I dumped the words on the dining room table and started creating poems on an old cookie sheet.

Here are the poems I created that day. I let the words take me down a strange and winding road.

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Unfortunately, I don’t have space to keep words strewn across the table or even to prop up cookie sheets against the walls. So this morning I cleared the old schedules from the fridge and moved my favorite coloring pages (from my daughter and nephews and husband) to the side of the fridge to make room for magnetic words. Poems are already appearing and rearranging on the fridge, and so far I’m the only one home! I can’t wait to see what else might be created once everyone else gets home!

Keri has the Poetry Friday Roundup today at Keri Recommends. Drop by and see what poetry morsels are offered this week.

Poetry Friday: What Have You Lost? Poems selected by Naomi Shihab Nye

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I spent months with this haunting volume of poems selected by Naomi Shihab Nye. I decided to treat myself to a poem a day, a poem for dessert or in place of an after-dinner mint. Of course, some evenings got busy and skipped a poem, but the poems always called me back.

Each of the 140 poems in the anthology What Have You Lost? ponders and answer to the question. The poems range from whimsical (such as the opening poem, “Dedication” by Jim Natal:  “This is to poems that get/lost in the dark…”) to heartbreaking (such as   “On the Suicide of a Young Boy I Did Not Know by Jennifer Weinblatt: “What do I do with this grief/that is not min, this story/that is not a story but a real/life abruptly gone…”)

The losses include those that come from growing up and growing old, from waging war and fighting prejudice, from letting go and clinging tightly. The poems that resonated deepest in my heart were those of parents watching their children grow up. My daughter is a senior this year, and I am aware of time slipping through my fingers. She will still be my daughter next year, but things will be different.

Interspersed among the poem are black and white portraits taken by Michael Nye. Each portrait tells its own story–or at least suggests enough for me to get lost in creating a story to go with it.

I suspect I will dip back into this book at other times because I have found poems that I suspect will speak to me even more at other points in my life. I am also pondering those things I have lost and looking to capture them in a poem before I lose them forever.

Now that the first week of the new year is past, I’m looking for the next volume of poetry to provide me with an after-dinner poem.

Tabitha Yeatts has the Poetry Friday Roundup today at The Opposite of Indifference. Drop by and see what poetry morsels are offered this week.

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

In an Instant

Earthquakes crumble
cities and villages
halfway round the world,
crushing people
under the rubble
of collapsed temples
and upended lives
in an instant,
while closer to home
fear and anger simmer underground
until another unexplicable act of violence
boils over into city streets,
setting fire to lives and communities
in an instant.
I want to help,
but any relief
I have to offer
seems puny
in the face
of so many lives
challenged in an instant.

PO-EMotions graphicAfter watching and reading the April poetry challenge by Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Readingfor the past several years, I decided to write a poem a day this month. Mary Lee is hosting PO-EMotion, with a different emotion for each day of the month. Today’s focus is RELIEF. For even more poetry fun throughout April, check out the roundup of poetry celebrations and projects at Jama’s Alphabet Soup

Piano Pride

Fingers plink at ivory keys,
looking for the ones
that match the notes
dancing across the clefs.
Again and again
fingers stumble and trip
until at last
melody and chords
pour out in song.

PO-EMotions graphicAfter watching and reading the April poetry challenge by Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Readingfor the past several years, I decided to write a poem a day this month. Mary Lee is hosting PO-EMotion, with a different emotion for each day of the month. Today’s focus is PRIDE. For even more poetry fun throughout April, check out the roundup of poetry celebrations and projects at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

An Inconvenient Optimism

A flash of red
darts under the back porch.
A yellow beak
grasps lengths of dried grass
to tuck behind the light.
Every day I clean
out the grass behind the light.
Every day the robin
deposits more,
hoping to build its nest
in the most inconvenient spot.

PO-EMotions graphicAfter watching and reading the April poetry challenge by Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Readingfor the past several years, I decided to write a poem a day this month. Mary Lee is hosting PO-EMotion, with a different emotion for each day of the month. Today’s focus is OPTIMISM. For even more poetry fun throughout April, check out the roundup of poetry celebrations and projects at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

Just a Glimpse

The heavens provided a peephole
through a cloudy sky.
A smear of rainbow
shimmered in midair,
no bigger than a thumbprint.
Colors–red and orange and green–danced,
hinting at the full promise
of the hidden arch.
No pot of gold teased
with empty promises
where a rainbow touched the earth.
Instead, the prism smear becckoned
us to be content with every step.

PO-EMotions graphicAfter watching and reading the April poetry challenge by Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Readingfor the past several years, I decided to write a poem a day this month. Mary Lee is hosting PO-EMotion, with a different emotion for each day of the month. Today’s focus is CONTENTMENT. For even more poetry fun throughout April, check out the roundup of poetry celebrations and projects at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

A Few Clerihew

I was inspired by Mary Lee to try my hand at writing some clerihew about people who showed some  zest.

There was a disciple named John.
This son of thunder was never wan.
Once Jesus called, he left his nets
Telling all that Jesus paid our debts.

Simon’s brother Andrew
followed Jesus instead of his family’s fishing crew.
He brought Jesus a boy with two fish and five loaves of bread
even when he didn’t know how the crowd would be fed.

A Pharisee named Saul changed his name to Paul.
His Lord Jesus told him to get on the ball.
No matter what insults the world hurled,
he continued to preach throughout the world.

After watching and reading the April poetry challenge by Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Readingfor the past several years, I decided to write a poem a day this month. Mary Lee is hosting PO-EMotion, with a different emotion for each day of the month. Today’s focus is ZEST. For even more poetry fun throughout April, check out the roundup of poetry celebrations and projects at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

Family Portrait

Click,

Flash,

Smile!

 

PO-EMotions graphicAfter watching and reading the April poetry challenge by Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Readingfor the past several years, I decided to write a poem a day this month. Mary Lee is hosting PO-EMotion, with a different emotion for each day of the month. Today’s focus is CHEERFULNESS. For even more poetry fun throughout April, check out the roundup of poetry celebrations and projects at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

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