Posts Tagged ‘books read’

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people  are reading.

image

November is National Picture Book Month, so I decided to jump in with the fun and catch up on some picture books this week. I have wanted to read more picture books, but didn’t take the time. A trip to the library netted a stack of good books for this week. Look for my post tomorrow where I give my reactions to these gems. For here, I’ll keep it simple with a list and pictures!

I finished…

  •  Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen
  • Click, Clack, Moo Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin, pictures by Betsy Lewin
  • The Wolf Who Cried Boy by Bob Hartman, pictures by Tim Raglin
  • Little Red Riding Hood a Newfangled Prairie Tale by Lisa Campbell Ernst
  • The Dancing Tiger by Malachy Doyle, paintings by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher
  • Old Bear by Kevin Henkes
  • Louise, The Adventures of a Chicken by Kate DiCamillo, pictures by Harry Bliss
  • Strega Nona’s Gift by Tomie dePaola
  • Hello, Red Fox by Eric Carle
  • The Story of Holly & Ivy by Rumer Godden, pictures by Barbara Cooney

IMG_20141110_161959103

 

IMG_20141110_161941920

 

sharp objectsSharp Objects by Gillian Flynn – I’ve heard all the hype about Gone Girl, but I haven’t read the book or seen the movie. But when I found this earlier novel by Flynn on my shelf, I decided to pick it up and see if I wanted to check out what the fuss is all about. On the surface, Sharp Objects is a murder msytery. Camille, a second-rate journalist from a small Chicago newspaper is sent back to her small Missouri town to report on two girls who turned up missing and dead–what appears to be the work of a serial killer. Along the way she must confront the dysfunctional family dynamics of her childhood. Okay, dysfunctional is an understatement. This book was intense on many levels–and downright disturbing on some. I had a hard time putting it down and just when I thought I had figured out who had done it, I was surprised.

 I’m reading…

les-miserablesLes Miserables by Victor Hugo – I made it to 90% this week! I really think I’m going to finish it. Jean Valjean’s journey through the sewers while carrying the unconcious Marius was much more harrowing in the book than the movie–and ended with a bit of treachery by our “friend” M. Thenadier that put Valjean in the hands of Javert. Another difference from the musical that I liked was that Javert chose to let Valjean go before he had his crisis that led to his death.

Poliser_SummerLettingGo_jkt_website_207_1The Summer of Letting Go by Gae Polisner – We’re getting to some of my favorite parts in the book. I am so glad I get to share the story of Frankie Sky and Beans and Bradley and Lisette with my daughter.

branding only works on cattleBranding Only Works on Cattle: the New Way to Get Known (and drive your competitors crazy) by Jonathan Salem Baskin – I’m trying to brush up on my marketing knowledge since the class I took way back in college. I may have been better off to start with something more basic rather than something trying to uphend conventional knowledge, but I do enjoy the voice (who knew writing about marketing could be funny) and the thought-provoking ideas.

Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy(AWAI) – I always had dreams of being a creative (fiction) writer, but I am pleasantly surprised by how much I am enjoying learning about and practicing copywriting.

Coming up…

I have a book on managing a freelance business to read and another trip to the library for more picture books planned!

What are you reading this week?

October books read

Happy Halloween! I’ve had many more treats than tricks with my reading this month. Instead of rushing through, I’ve been savoring. All the novels were my favorites. They are each so different that’s it hard to compare.

130) Chinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah – I’m so glad I finally read this heartbreaking, hopeful memoir

131) Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick – Another powerful read

132) Smokey Bear and the Campfire Kids – My first digital storybook app

133) The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer – Enola Holmes ranks right up there with my favorite sleuths like Nancy Drew and Harriet the Spy

134) Again Calls the Owl by Margaret Craven – I wish I could write prose so direct and filled with such beauty

135) This Dark Endeavor by Kenneth Oppel – a satisfying prequel to Shelley’s Frankenstein

What treats have you read this October? What books are you looking forward to in November?

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people  are reading.

image

My reading took strange and unexpected paths this week. Maybe not that unexpected, but I was surprised by what I picked up and what I finished and what I made progress on. I wonder what the next week will hold for my reading life?

I finished…

again calls the owlAgain Calls the Owl by Margaret Craven – As I read the first half, I kept wondering how it was a companion to I Heard the Owl Call My Name. Again Calls the Owl is memoir, but I did not remember the first book being a true story. I had to peek inside my old copy–definitely not a memoir to match what I was reading, but my confusion cleared up as a got to the last third. There Craven recounts her journey of writing this classic work of literature. And what a story it is!

cryptic crinolineThe Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer – I love Enola Holmes! I discovered that this is her fifth adventure. (I must find the earlier ones!) Her hard-of-hearing land lady, Mrs. Tupper, is threatened and kidnapped. As Enola tracks her down, she becomes drawn to the flame of Florence Nightengale and a mystery that has its roots back in the Crimean War. Once again she outwits her older brother to solve the case and escape once more from the dreaded boarding school.

I’m currently reading…

Poliser_SummerLettingGo_jkt_website_207_1The Summer of Letting Go by Gae Polisner – Nothing makes me happier than to hear my daughter ask, “Will you read to me tonight?” She’s dying to know who Frankie’s mystery date is, but I’m not telling!

les-miserablesLes Miserables by Victor Hugo – I’m so excited! I made it to 85% this week! Things are looking dire in the barricade. The soldiers have stormed across, the fighters have retreated to the house and soon all will be dead. No one knows what happened to poor Marius or the strange man who showed up to help but doesn’t fight. I might actually finish by the end of the year. It is doable to keep reading 2% or so a week.

this dark endeavorThis Dark Endeavor by Kenneth Oppel – I am enjoying this frightful read. It’s definitely a good book leading up to Halloween. I sympathize with Victor’s concern for his brother, but I am frightened by his jealous rages. My favorite character has to be Elizabeth.

Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy(AWAI) – I always had dreams of being a creative (fiction) writer, but I am pleasantly surprised by how much I am enjoying learning about and practicing copywriting.

Coming up… 

I want to pick up I Heard the Owl Call My Name and reread it, not just skip through pages to try to remember it. I already have some thoughts forming about how this older book and its companion memoir fit into today’s discussion of diversity in YA literature.

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people  are reading.

I jumped around quite a bit in my reading this week. I didn’t finish much, but I’ve enjoyed dipping into and out of quite a few good books.

I finished…

Smokey Bear and the Campfire Kids – I received a code to download this app to review (coming later this week). My first impression is I like that the app is focused on reading the story. The animations are cute but not distracting.

I’m currently reading…

Poliser_SummerLettingGo_jkt_website_207_1The Summer of Letting Go by Gae Polisner – We’re still reading this a few nights a week. I had hoped we would have more time during fall break, but somehow the days still filled up. The good news is the girl is still asking for us to read a chapter together as Frankie “Beans” puzzles out the mystery that Frankie Sky presents.

again calls the owlAgain Calls the Owl by Margaret Craven – I didn’t read too much this week, but I did dip into I Heard the Owl Call My Name. I definitely want to go back and reread it again, too. I did enjoy reading how Craven got her start with writing in what was then very much a man’s world.

les-miserablesLes Miserables by Victor Hugo – I actually made good progress this week and read quite a bit. I’m up to 82%!  I might even make my goal of finishing it by Christmas. The action is picking up behind the barricade. Marius saved the day and then sent Gavroche on an errand to get him out of the way. (He came back anyway.) Jean Valjean has also showed up behind the barricade, and they are waiting for the next attack.

this dark endeavorThis Dark Endeavor by Kenneth Oppel – I was looking for something spooky to get me in the mood for Halloween. This story of the young Frankenstein definitely fits the bill. Victor sows the seeds of evil quite young, even if he is motivated by love (and jealousy of) for his brother.

cryptic crinolineThe Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer – I’m listening to this one and I’m quite captivated by the young Miss Enola Holmes. She has quite a mystery with the disappearance of her landlady who lived a most surprising past during the Crimean War. And the mystery involves the Lady of the Lamp–Florence Nightengale.

Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy(AWAI) – We are back to class this week after taking last week off.

Coming up…

I think I had better finish some of the books I’m in the middle of right now.

What good books have you read this week?

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people  are reading.

image

I didn’t read–or at least didn’t finish–as much this week, but I had an exciting week with writing. Last Wednesday I had my first story published with a byline. You can check out my profile of the Southeastern Purdue Agricultural Center in the October issue of Farm Indiana! I also submitted my second story and had three more assigned, so it looks like I will keep busy writing this month, too. There’s still time to read goo books, especially as the temperature drops and the sun sets earlier. I also published a review of In My Hands by Irene Gut Opdyke on my blog last week. Here’s to this week’s reading adventures!

I finished…

two kidsTwo Kids by Richard Levine – I enjoyed this story of a year in the life of two friends. Stay tuned for an upcoming review and interview with the author!

I’m currently reading…

Poliser_SummerLettingGo_jkt_website_207_1The Summer of Letting Go by Gae Polisner – I’m still reading it aloud to my daughter. We both are enjoying the time together for a few minutes each evening (when homework and soccer schedules allow). I’m trying really hard just to read and not point out all the things I love about this book.

forgive me leonard peacockForgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick – My heart was racing when I listened to the chapters this morning. Let me just say without giving away too much that I love Herr Silverman and my heart aches for Leonard Peacock. I have no idea where the story will go next, but I’m pulling for Leonard.

les-miserablesLes Miserables by Victor Hugo – The action is heating up along the barricade, and Marius even had a chance to use his two pistols. I’ve made it to 77% of the way through the story. I am enjoying the book, but I think I prefer the musical.

chinese cinderellaChinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah – I started this memoir this week, and so far am impressed with the intelligence and courage the author shows. As a small child, she was unloved and unwanted by almost everyone in her household. Her older siblings blamed her for their mother’s death. Her stepmother resented all the stepchildren, but especially Adeline. Even her father ignores her except to praise her academic success.

Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy(AWAI) – Another couple of chapters read this week and another class down. I am learning that I enjoy this type of business copywriting more than I thought I would. This past week we brainstormed headlines–a very important hook.

Coming up…

I have two interviews scheduled this week, so I have lots of writing coming up. I also want to start the book a friend at church gave me yesterday, Again Calls the Owl by Margaret Craven. It’s the companion to I Heard the Owl Call My Name. I still have my grandmother’s copy of it, but haven’t reread it since I was a teen. I may have to go back to it again, too.

What has been your reading adventure this week?

September Books Read

My reading took many unexpected turns this month, but I enjoyed each surprise.  My favorites are Song of the Quarkbeast and In My Hands.

113) The Federal Election Commission Campaign Guide - This was an eye-opening read!

114) The Song of the Quarkbeast by Jasper Fforde – Wrap up quirky humor, eccentric magicians, fantastical creatures and you have a rollicking good read!

115) Love You Forever by Robert Munsch, illustrated by Sheila McGraw

116) Mud Pie Annie by Sue Buchanan and Dana Shafer, illustrated by Joy Allen

117) You Are Special by Max Lucado, illustrated by Sergio Martinez

118) Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by James Ransome

119) The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

120) The Golden Sandal: A Middle Eastern Cinderella Story by Rebecca Hickox, illustrated by Will Hillenbrand

121) Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China retold by Ai-Ling Louie, illustrated by Ed Young

122) The Egyptian Cindrella by Shirley Climo, illustrated by Ruth Heller

123) The Rough-Face Girl by Rafe Martin,illustrated by David Shannon

124) Confessions of a Murder Suspect by James Patterson – I’m not sure what I think of this audio book

125) Pucker Up by Rhonda Stapleton – This third Stupid Cupid novel is full of love and mishaps

126) The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Publishing Children’s Books by Harold D. Underdown – packed with practical information

127) In My Hands by Irene Gut Opdyke with Jennifer Strange – A beautiful, haunting, powerful addition to Holocaust literature, this time from the perspective of a Polish girl who risked her life to save her Jewish friends and fight the Germans.

128) Look Again by Lisa Scottoline – Another fast-paced adventure with a mom determined to learn the truth, no matter the cost.

129) Two Kids by Richard Levine – A friendship between two imaginatve, wise-cracking kids

What have been your favorite reads from September?

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people  are reading.

image

It’s been a good writing week. I posted two reviews this week of Pucker Up and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Publishing Children’s Books. I’m finishing up the profile of a gourd farm and starting on a another profile for a different publication. I do enjoy the opportunity to meet interesting people and write a bit of their story.

I finished…

in my handsIn My Hands:Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer by Irene Gut Opdyke with Jennifer Strange – This haunting, beautiful memoir is a powerful addition to Holocaust literature.  Even though she was “just a girl,” Irene saved the lives of many Jewish friends by passing along information and hiding a dozen people in the home of a German officer. I am still thinking about this quote: “You must understand that I did not become a resistance fighter, a smuggler of Jews, a fefier of the SS and the Nazis all at once. One’s first steps are always small: I had begun by hiding food under a fence.”

look againLook Again by Lisa Scottoline – Another fast-paced adventure with a strong mom determined to uncover the truth, no matter the cost. In this case, Ellen Gleeson, a reporter, glances at a “Missing Children” flyer and is stunned by her son’s resemblance to one of the pictures. Even though everyone advises her against it, she is determined to learn the true identiy of her adoptive son. Along the way she uncovers murder and kidnapping and puts herself and her son in danger. The plot may push the bounds of belief, but I kept turning pages late into the night to learn what happens.

I’m currently reading…

Poliser_SummerLettingGo_jkt_website_207_1Summer of Letting Go by Gae Polisner – It’s been a busy week with soccer games and late night homework, but my daughter still asks me to read every night we can. I suspect the only reason she hasn’t picked it up to finish it off is because she’s so swamped with school work. I’m glad to enjoy the story with her.

forgive me leonard peacockForgive Me, Leonard Peacock – When I started this audio book, I couldn’t remember anything about it except reading lots of positive reviews when it came out–and that it was an intense book. Let me say, that when I listened to the first chapter, I didn’t expect what I found–a teen plotting a murder-suicide at his school. I’m glad I’ve had lots of time to listen this week because the longer I’ve listened to Leonard tell his story, the more I am pulling for him.  I keep hoping someone will reach out and get through to him even though he pushes away every attempt thus far.

two kidsTwo Kids by Richard Levine – This came in the mail this week after the author sent me a review copy. So far I’m enjoying the two kids–gawky D.C. and bashful Rob–of the title though the story is slow to pick up.

les-miserablesLes Miserables by Victor Hugo – I’m plugging away. I may not reach my goal to finish by Christmas, but at least I’m back in the habit of reading some every week. The rebels are building the barricade, and Gavroche is in the middle of it all. He would be completely happy if only someone would give him a gun, too.

Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy(AWAI) – Another couple of chapters read this week and another class down. I am learning that I enjoy this type of business copywriting more than I thought I would.

Coming up…

I have lots of writing to finish up this week, so my reading plans are to finish what I’m in the middle of and make more progress with Les Mis. Of course, if something good comes my way (like the latest edition of Better Homes and Gardens) I’ll pick it up, too!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people are reading.

image

Once again, my reading took another unexpected turn.  Last Saturday, my daughter suffered a concussion during a soccer game.  What happens when you take a high energy, active, intelligent girl and take away all screens (television, computer, ipod, phone), take away reading and writing and even listening to audio books for a week?  You have a girl who is desperate to escape boredom but can’t do much of anything.  Once the worst of her symptoms passed, she begged me to read to her. Leery of taxing her brain too much, (Mental and physical rest is the cure of choice for concussions), I read aloud some of our old, favorite picture books, without showing her the pictures.  Much of what I read this week came from that.

I finished….

song of the quarkbeastSong of the Quarkbeast – Combine a dash of magic, quirky characters, and off-the-wall humor for a rollicking good story where the fate of the Ununited Kingdoms once again rests in the capable hands of foundling Jennifer Strange, who just happens to be the acting manager of Kazam Mystical Arts.  Click on the picture to check out my review.

B2B Business-to-Business Quick Start Guide by Steve Slaunwhite, Ed Gandia, Pete Savage for AWAI – I’m signed up to take a class on B2B copywriting next week, and I’m trying to read as much as I can before the class starts so I can get more out of it.

Picture books I read to my daughter (who still loved them as a sixteen-year-old):

IMG_20140914_203704542

  • Love You Forever by Robert Munsch, illustrated by Sheila McGraw
  • Mud Pie Annie by Sue Buchanan and Dana Shafer, illustrated by Joy Allen
  • You Are Special by Max Lucado, illustrated by Sergio Martinez
  • Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by James Ransome
  • The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers
  • The Golden Sandal: A Middle Eastern Cinderella Story by Rebecca Hickox, illustrated by Will Hillenbrand
  • Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China retold by Ai-Ling Louie, illustrated by Ed Young
  • The Egyptian Cindrella by Shirley Climo, illustrated by Ruth Heller
  • The Rough-Face Girl by Rafe Martin,illustrated by David Shannon

I’m currently reading…

summer of letting goThe Summer of Letting Go by Gae Polisner – Since my daughter enjoyed my reading favorite story books to her this week, she asked me to keep reading aloud to her before bedtime out of a novel.  Since she has been symptom free all weekend, I told her I would if I could pick the book.  She knew I was going to pick this one (I’ve been bugging her to read it all summer), and I know she’s going to love it.

les-miserablesLes Miserables by VIctor Hugo – I’m still making slow progress.  I’m stil lin the riots following the general’s funeral. There’s a lot of talk and action in many different parts of Paris.  I suspect it all happened much quicker than the lengthy description of it all.

complete idiot's guide to publishing children's booksThe Complete Idiot’s Guide to Publishing Children’s Books by Harold D. Underdown – Much of the information I’ve read this week I’ve picked up from following the blogs of different authors the past few years, but it is helpful to have it outlined in one place with all the possible variations.  I knew publishing was complex, but not just how complex until seeing it all in one place.

Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy – This is the text for the class I start this week.  As I get into it, much of the information is clicking into place and starting to make sense.  Even though the terminology and focus is different, I recognize many of the writing principles as lessons I taught my middle school students.

confessions of a murder suspectConfessions of a Murder Suspect by James Patterson – I had hoped to get through with this one, but I didn’t quite make it.  Tandy is remembering secrets that she had blocked from memory and discovering secrets about her family, but she is no closer to discovering who killed her parents.

Coming up…

This week will be busy with writing (I get to go on a road trip for an interview tomorrow!) and my class, but I hope to finish up some of the books I’m reading and dig into the stack of YA books I’ve been putting off through the summer. Which one should I read first?

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme sponsored by Sheila at Book Journey.  Kellee at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Menor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist.  It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next.  Join up with us and discover what good books other people are reading.

image

My reading week took a surprising turn–not at all what I expected to read. We also had a weekend filled with soccer, and I chaperoned the girls’ soccer team on their overnight tournament. I’m glad to be home and hopefully get back to a more expected reading and writing week.

I finished…

The Federal Election Commission Campaign Guide – A friend asked me to serve as treasurer on her campaign committee for Congress. Before I accepted, I wanted to know what I was getting into.  Let me just say that reading through all the rules, laws and guidelines for federal campaigns was eye-opening. I value even more Susan’s campaign that does not rely on extensive fundraising, but on talking with people directly.

I’m currently reading…

les-miserablesLes Miserables by VIctor Hugo – I didn’t get too far this week.  I only made it to 73%.  The story got bogged down with political theory about the differences between revolution and insurrection.  We did see the funeral of the beloved general that incited riots and Gavroche is a part of it all.  I like that kid.

complete idiot's guide to publishing children's booksThe Complete Idiot’s Guide to Publishing Children’s Books by Harold D. Underdown – I’m taking my time with this one to absorb the information.  One of the most valuable parts of this book is the resources included.  By the time I’m done, I’ll have sticky notes sticking out all over.

confessions of a murder suspectConfessions of a Murder Suspect by James Patterson – I’m not sure what I think of this one.  I’m intrigued enough to want to finish to find out who murdered the parents, but the narrator is a bit much.  She addresses the listener/reader frequently, and it seems almost overdone, especially when she’s dropping what seem to be obvious hints and claiming that “this is a story for another time.”

song of the quarkbeastSong of the Quarkbeast by Jasper Fforde – I’ve been waiting for this one since just after Christmas.  I received a paperback of the first book, The Last Dragonslayer, for Christmas. Since I started the series in paperback, I preordered the paperback for this second book in the series, and it just came out in the US.  I love Fforde’s wordplay and humor, and so far I’m loving Jennifer Strange’s second adventure.  Magic is indeed on the rise again, but that doesn’t mean the Kazam’s problems are decreasing. If anything, they face even more trouble.

Coming up…

I definitely will be finishing up the books I’m in the middle of here.  My goal is to catch up on some blog posts as well.  I have several good books I’ve been reading that I want to share.

What are you reading this week?

August books read

101)  Writer’s Digest Handbook of Magazine Article Writing edited by Michelle Ruberg – My crash course in freelance writing is starting to pay off.  This presents much information on getting ideas, querying magazines, conducting interviews & research, writing the article, and considering the business side of writing.

102) The Cup of Our Life by Joyce Rupp – I enjoyed going through this six week Bible study again.

103) Staff of Serapis by Rick Riordan – Annabeth Chase and Sadie Kane make an amazing partnership.  I’d love to read more combining the two series with Greek demigods and Egyptian magicians.

104) Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein – The audio version is powerful, but I am glad I read it first.  I’m not sure I could have followed it otherwise.

105) 2014 Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market edited by Chuck Sambuchino – I learned much from the articles and interviews.  The listings of publishers, agents, and magazines are a valuable resource.

106) Bugged!  How Insects Changed History by Sarah Albee – Why can’t all history be this much fun?

107) Praying in Color by Sybil MacBeth – I love the exploration of prayer through color and drawing.

108) Anne of Green Gables – Anne kept me in good company as I listened to an old favorite.

109) Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent – another reread that I enjoyed

110) And the Mountains Echoed by Kahled Hosseini – Breathtaking and beautiful

111) Save Me by Lisa Scottoline – exciting storyline that raises thought-provoking questions

112) Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie – I love Miss Marple in her first adventure!

1 2 3 10