It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journey and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. Kellee and Rikki at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Mentor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist. It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next. Join up with us and discover what good books other people are reading.

IMWAYR 2015

We are finally getting some cooler fall weather to enjoy! For some reason, I thought I would have a lot of extra time once my daughter left for college, but I can’t seem to find it. We are staying as busy as ever with work and fun.

Blog posts this week…

I finished…

Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom – What an inspiring story. It begins with a request from Albom’s rabbi: Would Mitch write the rabbi’s eulogy? As Albom gets to know his rabbi as more than the Man of God, he also encounters another Man of God–Henry Covington, the pastor of I Am My Brother’s Keeper church and homeless ministry in Detroit. The two men could not have had more different life stories, but both share a passionate love for God that spills over into love for neighbor and community. I know I have much to think about with my own faith after reading this one. I can’t wait to discuss it with my Bible study group and hear what they think, too.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth – Wow. I was blown away by this story. Cameron is a character who will stay with me for a long time. Her voice is at times snarky, at times vulnerable, at times hysterically funny, always courageous and honest. While Cameron’s story is at times heartbreaking (the death of her family, her time at school that is supposed to “cure” her of being gay), it is most of all hopeful and beautifully written. This is an important book, one that students–whether gay or not–need to have access to read.

Sweet Legacy by Tera Lynn Childs – I thoroughly enjoyed the conclusion to this trilogy of mythology and monsters. The triplets and descendants of Medusa–Gretchen, Grace, and Greer–are about to fulfill the prophecy that is their destiny. But just when they think they have things figured out, things get much more complicated. Not all monsters are bad. They boys who have come to help them are hiding secrets of their own. Not to mention, at least two sides of gods and monsters want to kill them. All they have to do is rescue the Gorgons, fight off the Olympians and open the door. Then they can take up their legacy of guarding the way between the realms and keeping balance.

I’m currently reading…

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman – Who knew the end of the world could be such a rollicking good time? I should have known that is what would happen when these two guys (who wrote the book together before they were literary gods themselves) join forces. I’ve just started, but I’m already snorting at the footnotes (I love funny footnotes) and becoming a fan of Crowly (originally known as Crawly–the snake who tempted Eve with the apple).

Coming up…

I need to remember to renew the library books I still have checked out in order to avoid those pesky fines. I still have two of the books I checked out last time to finish reading. I’m also looking forward to my mom’s visit starting Wednesday, and going to visit my daughter at college next weekend.

What have you been reading this week?

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

What happens when a wild, magical idea escapes into Discworld? Well, if you are Terry Pratchett, you write a funny send up of Hollywood known as Moving Pictures (Penguin Books, 1990).

For years, Holy Wood remained deserted. Now that that wild idea has escaped, people are headed toward Holy Wood for various known and unknown reasons. The alchemists came to escape the watchful eye of the wizards–and to put demons to work drawing pictures on octocellulose (highly explosive and highly captivating when shown as moving pictures). Ginger, the beautiful milkmaid, is determined to be the biggest and best she can be, whatever that means. She’s sure it doesn’t involve milking cows. Victor finally puts aside his status as an eternal student (who always fails by just a little, but probably knows more than the rest of the wizards at Unseen University. He’s not too sure about this whole moving pictures business, but finds himself a reluctant leading man.

Gaspode, the talking dog, shows up. Even though he is outshone by Laddie (a beautiful, loyal, dumb, golden dog) at every turn, Gaspode knows how to make a deal and take his 10 percent. Dibbler, the sausage seller, learns to sell movie magic as he turns into a movie mogul. Even the trolls show up to play their part–and maybe find a little romance if the rules would just stay the same.

Wherever they are coming from–and wherever they might be leading–the ideas keep flowing until the best movie of all time is made. The only question that remains is will anyone survive long enough to figure out what is really going on?

Once again, Pratchett skewers modern society, this time focused on its fascination with all things celebrity and movie. I’m not a huge movie buff, but even I enjoyed the movie references that I caught. I’m sure someone who watches more movies would laugh even more.

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story by Nora Raleigh Baskin

Even though I have read many glowing reviews of Nine, Ten (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2016), I was reluctant to start it. I was reluctant to revisit the events of September 11 even through the pages of a story. I am glad I did, though. Nora Raleigh Baskin has crafted a story that offers an introduction to this historical even that marks my life to readers who were not yet born when it occurred.

Baskin introduces us to four young people who don’t know each other. They live throughout the country, but their lives are about to intersect as one event impacts them all.

  • Sergio, a brilliant math student, lives with his grandmother and harbors a lingering anger at his father who only shows up when he wants something. His last appearance is too much for Sergio, who plays hooky from school the day before and meets Gideon, a New York firefighter. As he watches the towers smoke and then fall, Sergio worries about his new friend
  • Aimee struggles to fit in at her new school in California while missing her mom who now frequently travels with her new job. This time her mom is in New York City for a meeting at the World Trade Center. A call from Aimee keeps her from making her meeting on time.
  • Naheed was born in Columbus, Ohio, and has lived there all her life, but she feels like she sticks out ever since she began wearing her hijab. Trying to deflect attention off herself, she makes a classmate the target of student taunts. She knows that the right thing to do is to offer friendship to the awkward girl, but catastrophic news gets in the way.
  • Will still grieves the death of his father, killed in an accident along the side of the road over a year ago. He’s also not sure what to do with his changing feelings for Claire, a girl he has grown up with in the small town of Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Now all of a sudden, he realizes that she is a girl.

Even though none of these four children lose someone close to them in the September 11 attacks, their lives will never be the same. By focusing on just the day before and day of the attacks, Baskin shows children today how this even impacted everyone. The ending, a glimpse of the memorial service one year later, once again brings the four children together in a chance encounter and reminds us that we each have the choice to make. Will we let this tragedy bring us together or drive us apart?

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journey and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. Kellee and Rikki at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Mentor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist. It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next. Join up with us and discover what good books other people are reading.

IMWAYR 2015

Blog posts this week…

I finished…

Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett – Holy Wood has finally been forgotten long enough for it to release a dangerous idea–more than one, in fact. Soon, people from all over Discworld are streaming to Holy Wood, full of ideas they didn’t know they had and eager to take part in this new magic (but not magic like the wizards do), but none of them realize the danger that is close at hand. This is a great read for movie buffs. I’m not up on that many movies (new or old), but I caught quite a few allusions that made me laugh as Pratchett bends and twists them into brilliant humor.

Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story by Nora Raleigh Baskin – I finally got up the nerve to read my first 9-11 story. I’m glad I did. Baskin weaves together the stories of four teenagers across the country, focusing on the day before and the day of the attacks. Each one has different concerns that are affected differently by the events of 9-11. Their stories also interconnect in surprising ways. As I read, I kept comparing the events of the story to my experiences of that day. Even though there are obvious differences (for starters, I was an adult), much of it rang true, especially the emotional responses. This novel is an excellent introduction to 9-11 for middle grade students, all of whom now were born after the fact.

Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None adapted by Samuel French – Since I have a role in the upcoming production of our local theater group’s performance of this play, I figured I should read the rest of the script. (My role is to wear black and move props on and off the stage. I’ve also been reading parts for absent cast members during practice.) This is probable one of my favorite of Christie’s mysteries. In addition to revisiting it, I’m enjoying the process of seeing it come to life on the stage.

Surf’s Up by Kwame Alexander, illustrated by Daniel Miyares – I bought this for a birthday present for the son of friends. The author’s name is what first caught my eye (I loved Booked!), but I loved the story and illustrations once I read it. Two friends are ready for the beach: one wants to surf, the other read. Before you know it, the reader has convinced his friend that the book is exciting, and they switch roles. Even though I’m not a fan of Moby Dick, I laughed at the references to it throughout the story. I loved the message that this book sends (one I tried every year to convince my students of): it is possible to enjoy reading and also enjoy other activities. You can do both!

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling and more – Can I just say that I love that my daughter is growing up and now buys books that she brings home to share with me? I didn’t quite finish it before she left to go back to school, but now that I have, I can’t wait to discuss it with her. I like the story, but I do wish it had been a novel rather than a script. That’s just because I prefer the novel format–and I wanted to know more. I would love to see the stage production. Since I don’t have immediate plans to go to London, I can hope it one day goes on tour through the Midwest.

It’s the Little Things by Lena Williams – I found this in our church library. I’m pretty sure it is my copy that I donated a while back. I wanted to reread it in light of all the protests along racial lines that have been in the news. Williams write with insight about those little things–the daily interactions that may be done without thought or malice–that get under the skin. Much of it arises from the misunderstanding that comes with people in different racial groups simply don’t know each other–and may be afraid to speak up for fear of being misunderstood. I am thankful for the opportunity to read and listen and to try to understand a perspective different from my own.

I’m currently reading…

Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom – This is our latest selection for my Bible Study. I am fascinated by the stories of two–no, three–men that weave together in this account of faith. First, we meet the Reb, the rabbi of the congregation where Albom grew up. His request for Albom to give his eulogy begins the story. Next is Henry Covington, who grew up in a rough family and came to faith through a roundabout path. Finally, there is Albom himself, who is searching for what faith means for him. It’s hard not to read straight through to the end, but I’m trying to pace myself.

Coming up…

I have another stack from the library! Check out the title below.

img_20160912_083943542

What have you been reading this week?

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

Stella by Starlight by Sharon Draper

I have loved every book I’ve ever read by Sharon Draper, and Stella by Starlight (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2015) is no exception. In fact, Stella may be my all time favorite character that Draper has created.

Even though Stella loves stories, she struggles to put her ideas into words on paper. So she stays up late at night to practice under the light of the moon and stars. One night while she is out late, she and her little brother witness the Ku Klux Klan burning a cross across the pond in the woods. Stella is almost convinced that she recognizes one of the horses (and its rider) from around town, but it is dangerous to give voice to what she saw.

Growing up in the little town of Bumblebee, North Carolina, Stella lives in a segregated world in the 1930s. The rise of Klan activity threatens to stir up more trouble in her town, but not everyone is of one mind. There are acts of hatred that Stella must find the courage to confront–the home of a friend and neighbor is burned by the Klan, a doctor refuses to help a woman–Stella’s mom–bitten by a snake, white men beat a black boy for no reason.

But there are also acts of courage and hope. Stella rides to town with her father and a few other men to witness them register to vote. Stella finds a scared child hiding from the fire. Stella keeps practicing her writing and learns that she can find power in her words. Finally, Stella has the opportunity to save the life of someone she has every right to resent.

My only disappointment with the story is with that last scene by the pond. After rescuing a white girl from drowning in the pond, Stella learns some surprising truths about the girl’s life. It’s not as easy as it looks from the outside. Even though questions are raised, they are not resolved. Stella offers to take the girl home and ask her parents what to do, but we don’t get to see that conversation. I wanted to hear what her parents would say.

Woven throughout the story are samples of Stella’s writing as she struggles to capture her thoughts in words. Those selections are among my favorite throughout the pages.

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas

I’m still trying to wrap my brain around the fact that books set in the 1970’s–my childhood–are considered historical fiction. Am I really that old? Even though I did grow up during the 70’s, I still learned about history from reading It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel (Clarion Books 2016) by Firoozeh Dumas. I don’t remember the gas lines from the shortages. I vaguely remember seeing the count of days the hostages had been held in Iran and remember the joy at their release. I certainly didn’t know any of the history of Iran that led to the revolution and overthrow of the Shah. Even though this novel is set amidst serious history that raises serious issues still today, Dumas has written a story filled with warmth and humor.

There are so many things I love about this book. Here are just a few:

  • Zomorod–known as Cindy in her new school–is a narrator with a strong and distinctive voice. She loves and worries about her family even as she is embarrassed by them, especially their struggles with the English language and American customs. She wants desperately to fit in at her new school in Newport, California, and cringes at the ever worsening news from Iran which puts her even more in the spotlight. Her teachers want her to give special reports on Iran since she must be an expert, but she wants nothing to do with it. She does, though, want to protect her parents from the hatred that some in the neighborhood direct towards them.
  • Carolyn, Howie, Chris – Zomorod/Cindy’s friends are the best. These girls are smart, funny and determined. They are all part of the same Girl Scout troop and work together to earn badges and go camping. (Yes, I was a Girl Scout, too.) Even when Zomorod pushes them away, they remain steadfast friends. They even take on the role of detectives to see who has been leaving threatening messages and dead rodents on Zomorod’s door.
  • The bullies are more than just a one-dimensional character. There are two people who torment Zomorod, but both are revealed to have more going on. The original Cindy is Zomorod’s first friend, but as soon as they start middle school, Cindy turns on Zomorod in order to enhance her own social standing. Brock appears to be your typical dumb jock who throws food at her in the cafeteria, but Zomorod learns that he is much smarter than he lets own. In fact, Brock comes to play an important role in stopping the hatred that some in the condo association show.
  • Strong families are the norm. this is not one of those books where the parents are absent or horrible. Not all the families are perfect, but they hang together through it all. Zomorod’s mother has never gotten over her homesickness for Iran (and the family she left behind), but wants what is best for Zomorod. Cindy’s parents welcome Zomorod and reach out to her family to make them feel a part of their new country. Even Brock’s dad shows that untypical families can be strong, too.

Even though this story takes place in the 1970’s, it relates to today. We are still dealing with some of the same issues. Our history with Iran certainly plays out today. So does the mistrust some feel about immigrants who might look and speak differently. This is one of my favorite books from 2016. I hope it has a wide audience and wins many fans.

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journey and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. Kellee and Rikki at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Mentor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist. It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next. Join up with us and discover what good books other people are reading.

IMWAYR 2015

Blog posts this week…

I finished…

Simply Tuesday by Emily P. Freeman – I am learning to be content with small things, whether they be small beginnings or stops along the way. I am trying to remember to pull up a bench and invite others to sit down beside me. The hard part for me is giving up control. I like to plan and prepare and have things go my way, but slowly I am learning to trust that God’s kingdom isn’t measured by the same rules as kingdoms here on earth. I’m learning to look for God’s kingdom breaking in on this world in the unlikeliest of people and places. This has been such a thoughtful book for me to read and discuss. I suspect it is one I will revisit later and find just as much to ponder.

Stella by Starlight by Sharon Draper – This book is what historical fiction should be! I fell in love with Stella–her struggle with writing, her willingness to work to get better at it, her bravery in the face of discrimination and violence, her love for her family and community. Draper captures what life felt like for a black girl growing up in a small, North Carolina town during the Great Depression. Life was hard and most definitely unjust, but it also was filled with love and community.

I’m currently reading…

Walden by Henry Thoreau – I finished the second chapter on where he lived. I loved his description of the pond and woods and views. I had to laugh at his recounting of the story where he almost became a landowner. From his accounts, it was a narrow escape! I’m not sure my husband appreciated it, since he would love to own more land. Part of me, though, agrees with Thoreau that the best part of any land is not that which you can own, but that you take in with your eyes and ears and nose and store in your memories. Of course, it is much easier to “simplify, simplify” when you don’t have to worry about how to survive from one day to the next and have friends offer you land to build a shelter.

Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett – This time Pratchett sends up Hollywood in a riotously funny account of Holy Wood. You see, the last priest who stood guard at the door that corralled Wild Ideas died without training a successor. Now that Wild Ideas are leaking out, people are drawn to Holy Wood, where the alchemists have perfected the process of making moving pictures. Will the wizards figure out what has happened and stop things before they get out of hand and destroy the world as they know it? I don’t know, but it’s bound to be a funny trip.

Coming up…

I’ve been putting off Nine, Ten. I’ve peeked into it, and I’ve read many reviews that praise it. I’m just not sure I’m ready to revisit that day. Can it really have been so long ago that it’s the subject of historical fiction?

What have you been reading this week?

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie, illustrated by Yuyi Morales

What’s in a name? Quite a bit, if you ask Thunder Boy, Jr. Even though he looks up to his dad, he wants his own name. Besides, his dad is known as Big Thunder, and he is left with Little Thunder. As he says, “That nickname makes me sound like a burp or a fart.” What follows is a romp through all the possible names Thunder Boy, Jr. can think of to celebrate his own accomplishments, or what he dreams of doing. Most of all, though this book celebrates the relationship between father and son.

I’ve long been a fan of Sherman Alexie’s novels, so when I saw his name on the front of this picture book, Thunder Boy Jr. (Little, Brown and Company, 2016), I had to grab it. (No worries, no children were harmed in this library grab.) Just like in his novels, Alexie’s prose dances across the page. This book would be a hoot to read aloud. I also loved the illustrations, especially the contrast between dark and light. Yuyi Morales’s work is new to me (primarily because I am not as familiar with picture books), but I am not surprised to learn that she has already earned a Caldecott honor for an earlier book.

Besides being a fun book to read and share and look at, this book inspires me to write and invite others to write with me:

  • What is the story of your name? My mom filled me in on more details of where my name came from that went back more generations than I knew.
  • What name would you choose for yourself to mark your accomplishments or dreams? I suspect my daughter would dub me “Crazy Chicken Lady.”

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

It’s Monday! What are you reading? Is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journey and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. Kellee and Rikki at Unleashing Readers and Jen at Teach Mentor Texts gave the meme a kidlit twist. It’s a great way to reflect on what you’ve read and reviewed the last week and plan what you want to read next. Join up with us and discover what good books other people are reading.

IMWAYR 2015

I am getting used to a much quieter house this week. We moved my daughter into her college dorm room on Saturday. She is ready and excited to take on this new adventure, and I am excited for her. If I miss her too much, I can always send her chicken pictures and imagine the eye roll when she opens them.

Blog posts this week…

I finished…

Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie and illustrated by Yuyi Morales – When I saw Sherman Alexie’s name on the cover of this picture book, I couldn’t resist picking it up off the library shelf. This story is a fun romp through possibilities. Thunder Boy hates his name. He is named after his father, who gets to be called Big Thunder. Who wants to be known as Little Thunder? Thunder Boy imagines all the names he could have based on what he’s done until finally he and his dad pick the perfect name.

Mercy and Melons: Praying the Alphabet by Lisa Nichols Hickman – The last few letters of the alphabet did not disappoint: Xylophones and Exile, Yellow and Yahweh, Zin and Zinnias. Even better  is the last chapter with an invitation to pray the alphabet myself, an invitation to pay attention to the ordinary stuff that fills my days and bring it in conversation with what is holy. I love the question she asks us to ask ourselves each day: What did you do today that was amazing?

It Ain’t So Awful Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas – I’ve had her first book, Funny in Farsi on my wish list for some time now, so when I saw this at the library, I grabbed it. Now that I’ve read it, I want to read her memoir even more. It still blows me away that books set in the 1970’s are considered historical fiction. Even though I lived through the 70’s, I learned much about history, especially that of Iran and what led to the overthrow of the Shah. The background is heavy, but the story and the voice of the narrator (main character Zomorod–now known as Cindy) is hilarious. This book would pair well with Wonder with its emphasis on kindness. Come back for more in my review later this week.

Plan B: Further Thoughts on Faith by Anne Lamott – I love Lamott’s writing, and this collection of essays is spot on. I admire her honesty and courage in sharing the struggles she faces, and she is able to make me laugh while doing so. She reminds me that I don’t have to have all the answers before taking the “next right step.” We all muddle through this thing called life, and it’s much better when we can do it together.

I’m currently reading…

Walden by Henry Thoreau – I have found my favorite time to read Walden-during chicken time. Unfortunately, I often get distracted by the antics of the chickens (or of the neighbor’s dog who loves to watch chickens with me). I was reminded by Thoreau this week that the most valuable part of any landscape is not the part you can own with a deed, but the beauty you take with you in your mind from enjoying. I did enjoy his story of how he almost bought a property and escaped at the last minute when the farmer’s wife changed her mind about selling it.

Simply Tuesday by Emily P. Freeman – Once again, much of my reading seems to be coming together as Freeman reminds me to focus on the small things in life, especially as we choose between being led by fear or love. I can so relate to letting fear create storms even when the day is clear and sunny. As I adjust to having my daughter live away from home, I am constantly reminding myself (especially as I fall asleep at night) that the worst is not about to happen.

Coming up…

Check out the stack of books I snagged from the library this week. I’ve already read two, but I have many more to look forward to!

IMG_20160819_191111126_HDR

 

What have you been reading this week?

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

Going Postal and Making Money by Terry Pratchett

I am late in discovering the great Terry Pratchett, but at least I have gotten here at last. (Many, many thanks to my former student Anthony who first recommended the Discworld novels many, many years ago. They are as good as you promised me!)

Normally tyrants and con men are not among my favorite characters, but within the city of Ankh-Morpork, I have come to adore con man Moist Von Lipwig and even admire the tyrant Lord Vetinari who knows everything that happens–and controls most of it. Going Postal and Making Money give a hilarious account of the sometimes reluctant partnership.

Going Postal opens with Moist von Lipwig being led to his death. He falls through the trap door into a new chance at life–if he will accept Lord Vetinari’s offer to run the Post Office. It is no easy task. The Post Office has been falling apart–literally and figuratively–for years. Mail is no longer being delivered, so it piles up and fills every nook and cranny in the building. The only staff left are a bit strange. And there are powerful business forces that would like to see the whole thing put out of its misery.

Even though von Lipwig is not used to making an honest living, he finds that his skills as a con man can be put to good use as he gets the Post Office up and running. All it takes is a glittering gold suit, the introduction of stamps (even more fascinating to collect than pins), and a willingness to take on the clacks conglomerate. In his spare time, von Lipwig even discovers romance with a fierce defender of golems nicknamed killer and listens to the secrets whispered by the undelivered letters.

When Making Money opens, Moist von Lipwig has the Post Office running smoothly, but he is getting a bit bored. Lord Vetinari steps him to offer him a new challenge–making money by taking over the Mint and shaking up the entire banking industry. Von Lipwig is not sure he wants it (taking it on will ensure that powerful people such as the Lavish family will want to kill him), but fate intervenes when Topsy Lavish leaves her majority shares of the bank to her dog–and names von Lipwig as his caretaker.

Life may get even shorter for von Lipwig if he can’t pull the biggest con of his life on the people of Ankh-Morpork. All he as to do is break the world’s best counterfeiter out of jail, break into his own bank vault to rescue the chief clerk (who is hiding a desperate secret of his own) and discover what happened to all the gold that used to be in the vault. Oh yeah, he also has to talk to the dead to learn–and share–the secret to controlling the golems who now surround the city and threaten the balance of power throughout Discworld.

Life is never dull in Ankh-Morpork. I love the surreal world where things that shouldn’t make sense almost do. Even though the bizarre is commonplace, it has an eerie resemblance to our own world. I laughed out loud through much of these books and can’t wait to read more. I do hope the saga continues with the hinted promise of taking on taxes.

Disclosure: I participate in the Amazon Associates Program. If you decide to make a purchase by clicking on the affiliate links, including in the linked picture above. Amazon will pay me a commission. This commission doesn’t cost you any extra. All opinions are my own.

1 2 3 150